Monday, January 26, 2009

Tersely

 

twitter ravelry facebook

Are we turning into a nation of people who communicate best in 1- or 2-sentence sound bites? Social networks like ravelry.com, twitter.com or facebook.com don't encourage long philosophical conversations.  I became a fan of ravelry last year, and I've noticed a few things in my recent look into this subject:

  • You can get a feel for how something is received by filtering the stream for the general consensus  on twitter.  For example, Windows 7 and the new Palm Pre both appear to be eagerly anticipated.   I would guess that both of these products will be successful unless some really bad press happens between now and their release.
  • You can keep in touch with distant family members pretty well on facebook.  Pictures and day-to-day updates are easy to add to facebook, and you can limit your audience to only those people you wish to have access to your updates.
  • A smartphone like an iPhone with unlimited text messaging and unlimited data is perfect for this quickie communication.  I'm waiting for the Palm Pre :-)
  • You can be pretty clever in 140 characters.  Prime examples are @yarnharlot and @dooce on twitter.
  • Ravelry is the best source of knitting and crocheting community I have ever seen outside of an active face-to-face knitting guild.

Blogs are good for sharing information in larger chunks.  For example, String or Nothing, techknitting or knitterguy (Hi, Ted!) are good teaching blogs.  Some investment-focused blogs (I can't think of any right now) can be sources of current financial information.

Books.  Good old fashioned books remain my favorite way to absorb any subject in depth.  LibraryThing and GoodReads are terrific book networking sites.

So if you have read this far, thank you.  I'm not sure what the point of this post is, except that I think the way humans communicate is changing.  The people growing up right now will probably have different thinking skills than those of us who grew up doing our homework with paper and pencils.

No comments:

Post a Comment